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Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)
  • Author: Barbara T. Lieland
  • Publisher: Nova Publishers
  • ISBN: 1594547300
  • Page: 111
  • View: 373

The analysis in this book covers, first, the economic and geological factors that have triggered new interest in development, followed by the philosophical, biological, and environmental quality factors that have triggered opposition to it.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) consists of 19 million acres in north-east Alaska. It is administered by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in the Department of the Interior (DOI). It is a 1.5 million acre coastal plain on the North Slope of the Brooks Range that is currently viewed as one of the most likely undeveloped US onshore oil and gas prospects. According to the US Geological Survey, there is even a small chance that taken together, the fields on this federal land could hold as much economically recoverable oil as the giant field at Prudhoe Bay, found in 1967 on the coastal plain west of ANWR. That state-owned portion of the coastal plain is now estimated to have held 11-13 billion barrels of oil. The Refuge, and especially the coastal plain, is home to a wide variety of plants and animals. The presence of caribou, polar bears, grizzly bears, wolves, migratory birds, and many other species in a nearly undisturbed state has led some to call the area America's 'Serengeti'. The Refuge and two neighbouring parks in Canada have been proposed for an international park, and several species found in the area (including polar bears, caribou, migratory birds, and whales) are protected by international treaties or agreements. The analysis in this book covers, first, the economic and geological factors that have triggered new interest in development, followed by the philosophical, biological, and environmental quality factors that have triggered opposition to it. The book begins with a review of the nature and issues of the ANWR.


More Books:

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)
Language: en
Pages: 111
Authors: Barbara T. Lieland
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: Nova Publishers

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) consists of 19 million acres in north-east Alaska. It is administered by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in the Department of the Interior (DOI). It is a 1.5 million acre coastal plain on the North Slope of the Brooks Range that is currently
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Language: en
Pages: 150
Authors: Mary Lynne Corn
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003 - Publisher: Nova Publishers

The rich biological resources and wilderness values of north-eastern Alaska have been widely known for about 50 years, and the rich energy resource potential for much of that time. The future of these resources has been debated in Congress for over 40 years. The issue for now is whether to
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Language: en
Pages: 150
Authors: Mathew T. Cogwell
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002 - Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service highlights the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Alaska, which is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The refuge has its mission to protect the wildlife and habitats of this area for future generations.
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Subcommittee on Water and Power Resources
Categories: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska)
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988 - Publisher:

Books about Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Anwr)
Language: en
Pages: 32
Authors: Congressional Service
Categories: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska)
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-01-25 - Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

In the ongoing energy debate in Congress, one recurring issue has been whether to allow oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR, or the Refuge) in northeastern Alaska. ANWR is rich in fauna and flora and also has significant oil and natural gas potential. Energy development