Menu Close

Why Information Grows

Why Information Grows
  • Author: Cesar Hidalgo
  • Publisher: Hachette UK
  • ISBN: 9780465039715
  • Page: 256
  • View: 243

"Hidalgo has made a bold attempt to synthesize a large body of cutting-edge work into a readable, slender volume. This is the future of growth theory." -- Financial Times What is economic growth?

"Hidalgo has made a bold attempt to synthesize a large body of cutting-edge work into a readable, slender volume. This is the future of growth theory." -- Financial Times What is economic growth? And why, historically, has it occurred in only a few places? Previous efforts to answer these questions have focused on institutions, geography, finances, and psychology. But according to MIT's antidisciplinarian Cér Hidalgo, understanding the nature of economic growth demands transcending the social sciences and including the natural sciences of information, networks, and complexity. To understand the growth of economies, Hidalgo argues, we first need to understand the growth of order. At first glance, the universe seems hostile to order. Thermodynamics dictates that over time, order-or information-disappears. Whispers vanish in the wind just like the beauty of swirling cigarette smoke collapses into disorderly clouds. But thermodynamics also has loopholes that promote the growth of information in pockets. Although cities are all pockets where information grows, they are not all the same. For every Silicon Valley, Tokyo, and Paris, there are dozens of places with economies that accomplish little more than pulling rocks out of the ground. So, why does the US economy outstrip Brazil's, and Brazil's that of Chad? Why did the technology corridor along Boston's Route 128 languish while Silicon Valley blossomed? In each case, the key is how people, firms, and the networks they form make use of information. Seen from Hidalgo's vantage, economies become distributed computers, made of networks of people, and the problem of economic development becomes the problem of making these computers more powerful. By uncovering the mechanisms that enable the growth of information in nature and society, Why Information Grows lays bear the origins of physical order and economic growth. Situated at the nexus of information theory, physics, sociology, and economics, this book propounds a new theory of how economies can do not just more things, but more interesting things.


More Books:

Why Information Grows
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Cesar Hidalgo
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-06-02 - Publisher: Hachette UK

"Hidalgo has made a bold attempt to synthesize a large body of cutting-edge work into a readable, slender volume. This is the future of growth theory." -- Financial Times What is economic growth? And why, historically, has it occurred in only a few places? Previous efforts to answer these questions
Information Modelling and Knowledge Bases XXVII
Language: en
Pages: 364
Authors: T. Welzer, H. Jaakkola, B. Thalheim
Categories: Computers
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-02-04 - Publisher: IOS Press

Information modeling has become an increasingly important topic for researchers, designers and users of information systems. In the course of the last three decades, information modeling and knowledge bases have become essential, not only with regard to information systems and computer science in an academic context, but also with the
The Artist as Inventor
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Valentino Catricalà
Categories: Computer art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

This book opens new perspectives on cinema, arts, and the media. It provides a rereading of the past and explains the challenges facing artists today.
Social Evolution, Political Psychology, and the Media in Democracy
Language: en
Pages: 363
Authors: Peter Beattie
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-13 - Publisher: Springer

This book analyzes why we believe what we believe about politics, and how the answer affects the way democracy functions. It does so by applying social evolution theory to the relationship between the news media and politics, using the United States as its primary example. This includes a critical review
Communicating, Networking: Interacting
Language: en
Pages: 77
Authors: Margaret E. Robertson
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-04 - Publisher: Springer

This book illustrates the benefits to be gained from digitally networked communication for health, education and transitioning economies in developing nations (Sierra Leone and Papua New Guinea) and developed nations. Growing powers of e-citizenship can help build sustainable futures. This small volume provides a collection of examples and ideas from